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Posts tagged: Weight Management

Red Seal's Health Blog


The Sunshine Vitamin – are you getting enough?

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Most of us are now very aware of the damage the sun can cause and the days of sun baking and sun worship are gone. The nationalised program of “slip, slop, slap, wrap” to cover up with clothing, hats, sunscreen and sunglasses has become a national mantra to protect against sunburn. It is no surprise when New Zealand rates of melanoma are the highest in the world. Shunning the sun has meant many have taken a toll on their health without realising it. This combined with aspects such as an indoor lifestyle, increased age, increased weight, dark pigmented skin and dietary constraints such as avoiding dairy products, adhering to a strict vegan diet or those who are on cholesterol lowering medication impact the level of Vitamin D intake.  The “sunshine vitamin”, Vitamin D is produced by the body in response to skin being exposed to sunlight, but it is also occurs naturally in a few foods – including some fish, (such as salmon, tuna, and mackerel), fish liver oils, egg yolks, and fortified dairy.

Many people tested for Vitamin D levels show that they are below optimal levels.  Generally it is considered 5 to 15 minutes of daily summer sun exposure on bare skin on our arms and legs, to give us enough Vitamin D to help keep us healthy.

The symptoms of a Vitamin D deficiency in adults include:

  • unexplained fatigue
  • severe bone or muscle pain
  • stress fractures, especially in the legs, pelvis, and hips

The change of season often means increased chances of winter bugs. Cold wet days of winter and end of summer for many of us means reduced outdoor time and decreased sunshine exposure.

It is not surprising with the change of season that more people come down with lurgies as the drop in this vitamin has been linked to a decrease in immune function. Vitamin D for many years has been one of those nutrients that have gone almost unnoticed by many because we make it naturally with sun exposure. Recent studies have shown there is a connection to this nutrient with supporting the immune system, mood balance, bone health and other serious illnesses.

Vitamin D is important for:

  • Normal growth and development of bones and teeth
  • Disease resistance
  • reducing risk of some serious illnesses.
  • reducing risk of ills and chills.
  • Supporting weight Management
  • Supporting balanced mood.
  • Bone strength and integrity
  • Healthy heart function and normal blood pressure
  • Joint mobility
  • Protective effect from some serious illnesses

Doctors can diagnose a Vitamin D deficiency by performing a simple blood test. If you have had your Vitamin D levels tested, it’s important to understand what the results mean, and what action you might need to take. The results of the blood test can tell you whether you’re getting too little, too much or the right amount of vitamin D.

There has been some controversy over the amount of vitamin D needed for healthy functioning. Recent research indicates that you need more vitamin D than was once thought. Normal blood serum levels range from 50 to 100 micrograms per decilitre. Depending on your blood level, your Vitamin D intake needs may be increased.

Vitamin D blood levels  
0-10ng ml Deficiency – likely to have health problems
10-20 ng/ml Low levels
20-30 ng/ml Maybe enough
40-50 ng/ml Getting enough
50-60 ng/ml Good range/ normal
60-70 ng/ml High normal
80-90 ng/mg Higher than normal range
100 -150 ng/mg Not toxic but considered too high
<150 ng/mg Levels considered toxic and may be damaging to your health
   

 

If you feel you are lacking Vitamin D and are looking for a way to supplement it, consider adding Vitamin D rich foods into your diet, enjoy a few minutes of sunshine daily and look for supplements such as a multivitamin, Cod Liver oil and calcium products with it added.

Always read the label and use as directed. Supplementary to a balanced diet. Endeavour Consumer Health, Auckland

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Garcinia Cambogia – A slimmer’s advantage

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“Diet” is a four letter word that most of us shudder at when we realise that we have gained a few extra pounds. The thought of dieting is often connected with feelings of self-deprivation; doing it hard… going hungry, being moody, craving something sweet or naughty and feeling deprived when you can’t have it, but feelings of failure if you succumb to the temptations. All these things can lower your ability to stick to any weight management programme. Those that are steadfast and the most self-controlled of us can stick to a diet and reach our goal weight, but what if there is a little support to help overcome these obstacles?

This is where the advantages of a small pumpkin shaped citrus fruit from Indonesia can help! Commonly used in Indian cooking and chutneys, Tamarind (also known as Garcinia Cambogia) with the active component hydroxycitric acid (HCA), has increasingly become a popular weight management aid all over the world. Research has shown that this fruit can help with stress levels, support healthy levels of “the happiness neurotransmitter”, help manage appetite and sugar cravings and help the body metabolise fat.

HCA supports healthy levels of a vital enzyme Citrate Lyase. Our bodies naturally convert food calories we consume into energy. Extra calories than what we need is stored in the liver and muscles as glycogen. Glycogen is the reservoir energy reserve ready to use when the body needs it. When the reservoir is at capacity then the brain will signal to us that we have had enough and we get a sensation of fullness after eating. But overeating when full, will result in the body producing fat from carbohydrates and turning these extra calories into fatty acids and cholesterol. HCA supports reduced action of the enzyme ATP-citrate lyase, helping normal fat metabolism and healthy cholesterol balance of LDL (bad cholesterol) and triglycerides.

HCA also helps manage appetite and supports healthy levels of your brain’s serotonin levels. Serotonin is a neurotransmitter in your brain that gives an increased sense of wellbeing. Low levels of serotonin can result in feelings of worry and despair; triggering many into behaviour that creates emotional or reactive eating. By supporting healthy serotonin levels, HCA supports good mood and lessens the drive to react to stressful situations with food. Serotonin is also an important precursor to melatonin – the neurotransmitter that is vital in sleep regulation. Getting enough sleep is also shown to be important in weight management.

As you eat less, your body releases the stored fat in your fat cells for energy. Because Garcinia Cambogia extract is a fruit and not a chemical, it is all natural with few known Garcinia Cambogia side effects. But some people have experienced dry mouth, or digestive disturbance.

Garcinia cambogia is a great product to use if extra will power is needed, if belly fat is problematic, if stress, or sleep and overall mood needs some support while dieting. But Garcinia Cambogia is best used in conjunction together with a diet rich in whole, natural foods.

  • Supports healthy fat metabolism
  • Supports appetite management
  • Supports good mood
  • Supports belly fat management
  • Supports sleep
  • Helps manage sugar cravings
  • Help decrease stress levels

We use Garcinia Cambogia in our Body Right Tea range and our Fit Protein – Shaping Vanilla.

*Always read the label and only take supplements and herbs as directed and if you are taking any medication please check with your health adviser. Endeavour Consumer Health Ltd, Auckland

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4 Steps to a Good Night’s Sleep

There are many reasons why some people don’t sleep. Are you a natural born lark or owl?  Do you need twelve hours of sleep or five? Do you fall asleep but wake up several times at night or do you have trouble even falling asleep?

It’s first helpful to identify the problem(s) keeping you awake. By looking at a combination of several things you can start to build a strategy for bedtime and sleep.

Common reasons for not sleeping

    1. Thyroid problems
    2. Stress or depression
    3. Side effects from medication
    4. Allergies
    5. Sleep apnea (Lack of oxygen or breathing incorrectly, especially while sleeping).
    6. Jet lag
    7. Menopause
    8. Clock watching
    9. Too much caffeine or alcohol
    10. A snoring or restless partner
    11. Smoking
    12. Shift work
    13. Vitamin and mineral deficiencies
    14. An over active bladder or prostate issues
    15. Lack of physical exercise
    16. Cramp or restlessness

Step 1: Develop Better Daytime Habits

  • Don’t nap during the day. Napping during the day will throw off your body clock and make it even more difficult to sleep at night. If you’re feeling especially tired and absolutely have to nap, do so for less than 30 minutes and keep it early.
  • Limit caffeine and alcohol. Although alcohol may initially act as a sedative, it can interrupt normal sleep patterns. Some people are so sensitive that even one cup of tea or coffee during day can affect their sleep. There are some herbal teas that help relax the body and don’t have the stimulating effect of caffeinated drinks.
  • Don’t smoke. Nicotine is a stimulant and can make it difficult to fall and stay asleep. Smokers often has difficultly sleeping due to nighttime withdrawal symptoms.
  • Medication Many medications can have the side-effect of disrupting sleep patterns, so always check the small print and keep yourself informed. Famous culprits include antidepressants, heart and blood pressure medications, allergy medications, stimulants (such as Ritalin) and corticosteroids. Some OTC medications, including some pain medication combinations, decongestants and weight-loss products contain caffeine and other stimulants. Antihistamines may initially make you groggy, but can worsen urinary problems, causing you to get up to pee more at night!
  • Expose yourself to bright light/sunlight soon after waking up. This will help regulate your body’s natural biological clock. On the flip side, keep your bedroom dark while you’re sleeping so the light won’t interfere with your rest.
  • Exercise early in the day. Twenty to thirty minutes of exercise every day can help you sleep, but be sure to exercise in the morning or afternoon. Exercise stimulates the body and aerobic activity before bed may make falling asleep more difficult.
  • Check your iron levels. Iron-deficient women tend to have more problems sleeping, so if your blood is iron poor, a supplement might help your ability to sleep.
  • Magnesium is the mineral to help your body release tension and relax. Cramps, tight muscles and insomnia are all signs you may need to add supplemental magnesium into your day.
  • B vitaminsResearch has shown that maintaining sufficient levels of Vitamins B3, B5, B6, B9 and B12 may help achieve good sleep. B vitamins help regulate the body’s level of tryptophan, an amino acid important for maintaining healthy sleep. Vitamin B3 (niacin) often promotes sleep in people who have insomnia caused by depression and increases effectiveness of tryptophan and is an important nutrient to help people who fall asleep rapidly but keep waking up at the night. A deficiency of B5 (pantothenic acid) can cause sleep disturbances and fatigue, so keeping good levels can support your body in time of stress and anxiety. Vitamin B9 (folic acid) deficiency has been linked to insomnia. Vitamin B12 (cobalamin) is reported to help insomniacs who have problems falling asleep, as well as promoting normal sleep-awake cycles.
  • Eat to enhance sleep. Some foods are more conducive to a better night’s sleep than others. You already knew about warm milk, chamomile tea and turkey, but bananas, potatoes, oatmeal and whole-wheat bread are great food too. Avoid food with additives like MSG, colours, aspartame, or food/drinks that cause you digestive problems
  • The power of herbs. Some herbs are classified as nervine herbs and are known to help tone, relax and strengthen your nervous system  They’re generally considered safe and non-addictive. These herbs are not hypnotics and will not “put you to sleep”, but rather help relax and assist the body in preparing for sleep. These include; chamomile, red bush, valerian, lemon balm, passionflower and skullcap.

Step 2: Create A Better Sleep Environment

  • Make sure your bed is large enough and comfortable. Disturbed by a restless bedmate? Switch to a queen or king-size bed. Test different mattresses and try therapeutic-shaped foam pillows that cradle your neck or extra pillows that help you sleep on your side.
  • Be careful of allergies. Some people are allergic to feathers and down, wool, nylon or dust, so make sure that materials used on your bed are right for you.
  • Make your bedroom a place for sleeping. Don’t use your bed for paying bills, doing work or watching movies. Help your body recognise that this is a place for rest or intimacy!
  • Keep your bedroom peaceful and comfortable. Make sure your room is well-ventilated and the temperature consistent. Keep it quiet. You could use a fan or a “white noise” machine to help block outside noises.
  • Hide your clock. A big, illuminated digital clock may cause you to focus on the time, making you feel stressed and anxious. Place your clock so you can’t see the time when in bed.
  • Electromagnetic smog.  Electro-smog is the collective term for all artificially generated electrical, magnetic and electro-magnetic fields. Electro-smog is invisible, inaudible and odorless, but omnipresent. Examples of its sources are all kinds of domestic electrical installations, cordless telephones, mobile phones, baby intercoms, TV, radar and radio communications. It’s been estimated that a small percentage of people may have sleep disturbance, fatigue, increased concentration of stress, headaches and skin irritation linked to influences like electromagnetic smog, and eliminating these devices from your sleep area may help.
  • Blocking out noise and light. A dark room is an important part of regulating Melatonin ( the natural sleep hormone) levels. Having trouble falling or staying asleep may be due to an environmental issue like too much light. Eye masks or blackout curtains can help.  Also make sure to turn off mobile phones, fans and machines that create noises that could disrupt you.     

Step 3: Do These Things When You Wake in the Middle of the Night

  • Get out of bed if unable to sleep. Don’t lie in bed awake. Go into another room and do something relaxing until you feel sleepy. Worrying about falling asleep actually keeps many people awake.
  • Don’t do anything stimulating. Don’t read anything job related or watch a stimulating TV program. Don’t expose yourself to bright light as this gives cues to your brain that it’s time to wake up.
  • Toilet breaks. If you need to go to the bathroom, don’t switch the light on. Consider a dim night light that can light your way and will automatically switch off.
  • Get up and eat l-tryptophan.  Some people get tired after eating a turkey meal as it is a major building block for making serotonin, a neurotransmitter that helps promote sleep. We don’t always have turkey in the fridge, but another common source is pumpkin seeds and dairy products.
  • Consider changing your bedtime. Some people need more sleep than others. If you suffer from sleeplessness or insomnia consistently, think about going to bed later so that the time you spend in bed is actually spent sleeping. If you only get five hours sleep every night, figure out what time you need to get up and subtract five hours (for example, if you want to get up at 6:00 am, go to bed at 1:00 am). This may seem counterproductive and at first but it can help train your body to sleep consistently while in bed. When you are spending all of your time in bed sleeping, you can gradually sleep more by adding 15 minutes at a time.
  • Owl or lark? People are naturally Night Owls and others Larks! Which one are you? Some people find they are natural Night Owls and work better at this time of day. You might find it best to create your lifestyle around your particular sleep patterns.

Step 4: Keep a Sleep Diary 

Learn about your sleep patterns and habits by keeping a daily sleep diary. Be sure to include:

  • Time you went to bed and woke up
  • Total sleep hours
  • Quality of sleep
  • What is hormonal cycle right now?
  • Times that you were awake during the night and what you did (e.g. stayed in bed with eyes closed or got up, had a glass of milk and meditated)
  • Amount of caffeine or alcohol you consumed and times of consumption
  • Types of food and drink and times of consumption
  • Feelings – happiness, sadness, stress, anxiety
  • Drugs or medications taken, amounts taken and times of consumption
  • Did herbal teas (chamomile, peppermint, valerian, passionflower or skullcap) before bed help?
  • Does B vitamins help?
  • Taking Magnesium before bed time work for you.
  • Try a combination of herbal teas, B vitamins and magnesium?
  • Check your room for noise and light issues
  • Check your room for gadgets that would give off electro-magnetic fields
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Why Take a Multivitamin?

One of the most commonly asked questions is “Why should I take a multivitamin supplement?”

Because vitamins and minerals are essential nutrients that the human body alone cannot manufacture in sufficient quantities to provide the foundation for all normal biological functions. Vitamins and minerals are required for normal metabolism, growth, and general well being. A single deficiency of any vitamin or mineral can endanger the whole body. Many people believe they are eating the ‘right’ foods, and getting the proper amount of essential nutrients in this way. And, of course, eating a balanced diet is one way to obtain the vitamins and minerals you need.

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Your Digestive System and How It Works

Why is digestion important?
How is food digested?
How is the digestive process controlled?

The digestive system is a series of hollow organs joined in a long, twisting tube from the mouth to the anus. Inside this tube is a lining called the mucosa. In the mouth, stomach, and small intestine, the mucosa contains tiny glands that produce juices to help digest food.

Two solid organs, the liver and the pancreas, produce digestive juices that reach the intestine through small tubes. In addition, parts of other organ systems (for instance, nerves and blood) play a major role in the digestive system.

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Understanding Antioxidants

What Is an Antioxidant?

You may have heard about the health benefits of antioxidants, but do you know what an antioxidant is — and how they actually work?

Antioxidants are dietary substances including some nutrients such as beta carotene, vitamins C and E and selenium, that can help prevent damage to your body cells, or repair damage that has been done.

Antioxidants work by significantly slowing or preventing the oxidative — or damage from oxygen — process caused by substances called free radicals, that can lead to cell dysfunction and the onset of problems like heart disease and diabetes. Antioxidants may also improve immune function and perhaps lower your risk for infection and cancer.

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